Quantum Biology: harnessing nanotechnology's last frontier using modified excipients and food ingredients

  • Shireesh Apte Editor

Abstract

Emerging evidence indicates that quantum phenomena may be operational in biological systems despite unfavorable temperatures and environmental noise. It  is possible that protein quaternary architecture may be conducive to sustaining quantum entanglement and coherence. Models ranging from quantum resonant recognition, proton tunneling in DNA, radiation wave therapy and the magnetic isotope effect have been proposed that validate the importance of the wave-particle duality of matter in persisting in and modulating biological processes. The ability of food ingredients and pharmaceutical excipients to manipulate bioeffector mechanisms via quantum effects is discussed. It is hoped that this new perspective will provide impetus for further research in this field.

Published
2014-12-19
How to Cite
APTE, Shireesh. Quantum Biology: harnessing nanotechnology's last frontier using modified excipients and food ingredients. Journal of Excipients and Food Chemicals, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 4, p. 177-183, dec. 2014. ISSN 21502668. Available at: <https://ojs.abo.fi/ojs/index.php/jefc/article/view/882>. Date accessed: 24 oct. 2021.
Section
Reviews

Keywords

Quantum biology; nanotechnology; food ingredients; excipients; magnetic isotope effect; resonance recognition model; proton tunneling; quantum dots